• Understanding the Role of DITI* in Breast Screening

    The benefits of DITI do vary between age and risk groups.

    With the pre mammogram age group (under 50) the benefits of screening to detect any findings or changes that justify additional testing or closer monitoring are simple. With any positive DITI findings in this younger age group, any mammogram and ultrasound sensitivity and specificity will be increased with the objective DITI findings targeting a dysfunction and location and providing decision making information in women that would not have otherwise been tested.

    It takes years for most cancers to develop to the stage that they can be detected with mammogram or ultrasound (dense enough for location and biopsy) so DITI is ideally placed as a screening tool to identify changes over time in the ‘early’ development stages, before there is more advanced pathology that can be detected with other tests.

    The major benefit in this group is in detecting early changes that precede malignant pathology that will become diagnosable at some stage.

    Early detection is aimed at prevention and if early changes are detected then we have an opportunity to intervene and change the outcome.

    The earlier an abnormality is detected the better the treatment options will be, resulting in a better outcome.

    Prevention may include treatment of inflammation, fibrocystic disease, lymph congestion, estrogen dominance and more specific conditions like angiogenesis. [Read More…]

  • What’s Best for Your Breasts?

    Thermograms vs. mammograms

    Published: October 5, 2010

     by CHRISTIANE NORTHRUP, M.D.

    Taking the sane approach for better breast health.

    TODAY, MANY WOMEN with a family history of breast cancer are opting for genetic testing to determine whether they carry the abnormal breast cancer genes one (BRCA1) or two (BRC2). When the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are healthy, the body is more likely to hinder breast cancer cell growth. When these same women test positive for the (mutated) breast cancer gene, many are opting for a preventative bilateral mastectomy (the removal of two, usually healthy, breasts). This is happening more and more, even though only five to ten percent of all new breast cancers occur in women who carry the gene!1

    Women wrongly conclude that if they carry these mutated genes, they are destined to develop cancer. Dr. Colin Begg, Chair of the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and fellow researchers determined after studying 2000 women from different countries that breast cancer risk varies widely among women with mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Other factors contribute to a women’s risk, including family history, diet, and lifestyle choices.2 This means that testing positive doesn’t mean you will get breast cancer—and testing negative doesn’t mean you are protected from developing breast cancer! [Read More…]

  • Dr. Mercola – Breast Thermography

  • Thermography at the Natural Health Center

  • Special Report: Beating Breast Cancer with Thermography