• American Cancer Society abandons ‘one size fits all’ advice on mammograms

    mammograms

    By Karen Kaplan – Contact Report
    Los Angeles Times – October 20, 2015

    After a thorough review of the benefits and limitations of mammograms, the nation’s top cancer-fighting organization is advising women that they can wait until they are 45 years old to start using the tests to screen for breast cancer.

    New guidelines from the American Cancer Society also assure women that they can have fewer mammograms over the course of their lives.

    The guidelines, published in Wednesday’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., are designed for women who are in good health and have no reason to suspect their risk of developing breast cancer is above average. The findings represent a departure from the group’s previous recommendation that all women with an average risk of breast cancer get annual mammograms starting at age 40.

    The American Cancer Society has updated its guidelines for average risk women.

    Although the American Cancer Society still endorses that course for women who prefer it, the group acknowledged that some women favor a less-aggressive approach to breast cancer screening. If so, it said, they can delay their first mammogram until they are 45 and wait two years between screenings starting at age 55 without fear that doing so will put their health in jeopardy.

    Either way, regular mammograms should continue as long as women have a life expectancy of at least 10 years and are good candidates for breast cancer treatment, the guidelines say. [Read More…]