• Thermography can detect subtle changes in body

    Beth Roessner, The Desert Sun 5:38 p.m. PDT May 28, 2014

    full-bodyLu Molberg of Palm Springs is a firm believer in alternative medicine. Through research and pursuing treatments that aligned with her beliefs, Molberg became an informed health care consumer. Taking control of her health has been empowering, she said.

    “You do have to have trust in health care,” said Molberg, “but most of all you have to have trust in yourself to make the right decisions.”

    Now in her 70s, Molberg stays healthy by monitoring the energy aspects of her body, teaching t’ai chi and staying current on her health care appointments.

    One practice that Molberg subscribes to is thermography — a non-invasive, full-body infrared scan that can help detect any changes in her body on a physiological level. Conventional practices like mammography have their place, but thermography, she said, is the path of least resistance.

    “You’re able to relate to a person and not a machine,” Molberg said. [Read More…]

  • Minnesota and Rhode Island enact breast density laws

    May 27, 2014

    dense-breastsby Loren Bonner , DOTmed News Online Editor

    This week, Gov. Lincoln Chafee signed Rhode Island’s breast density inform bill into law, and late last week, Gov. Mark Dayton did the same for Minnesota women.

    Breast density laws require physicians to inform women if they have dense breasts along with the possible risks that can be present.

    Minnesota becomes the sixteenth state with mandatory breast density notification for women, and Rhode Island became the seventeenth.

    Connecticut was the first state to pass breast density inform legislation in 2009, followed by Texas, Virginia, California, New York, Hawaii, Maryland, Alabama, Tennessee, Nevada, Oregon, North Carolina and Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Arizona and now Minnesota and Rhode Island. [Read More…]

  • Mammography controversy needs greater participation to inform decisions

    Wednesday 7 May 2014 – 2am PST

    Doctors at the World Congress on the Menopause in Cancun, Mexico, have called for any decision to participate in mammography to be a based on an informed choice and consideration of all factors, rather than just be an automatic process.

    A major session at the World Congress on the Menopause has debated the benefits and risks associated with regular mammography. The potential benefit of mammography is earlier detection of breast cancer, but increasing evidence has shown that mammography also uncovers some cancers which would not go onto cause any problem, and many doctors believe that this over diagnosis can cause real harm through unnecessary treatment. The debate in the scientific press has led to confusion in the minds of many women, who hope for a definitive answer on whether or not they should undergo regular mammography.

    Now two prominent doctors from opposing sides of the debate have agreed that women need to be more involved in making decisions on whether or not mammography is right for them.

    Dr Eugenio Paci presented work from the EUROSCREEN working group, showing that over diagnosis is at the lower end of the estimates, indicating that mammography saves lives. This work indicates that screening 1000 women saves up to 7 lives, with only 4 over diagnosis. Professor Robin Bell presented an analysis showing that up to 40% of invasive breast cancer cases identified in women invited for mammography may be over diagnosed, and says that the total number of deaths in screened patients does not drop when measured against non-screened patients, indicating that screening has few benefits. [Read More…]