• Mammogram screening and overdiagnosis: tumor size an issue?

    Hologic Imaging MachineDOTmed.com – Health Care Business Daily News
    Written by: Thomas Dworetzky , Contributing Reporter

    A just-published study of breast cancer data has raised the issue of overdiagnosis from mammography screening – and puts tumor size squarely in the middle of the debate.

    That’s because many “small breast cancers have an excellent prognosis because they are inherently slow-growing,” according to Yale Cancer Center experts in a June 8th New England Journal of Medicine report, which weighed in on the benefits of breast cancer early detection.

    Frequently these smaller tumors come from slow-growing cancers that may not become an issue during a patient’s lifetime, they noted. [Read More…]

  • The Radiant Health Show with Dr. Christine Horner – Carla Garcia, C.T., D.O.M

    Is Thermography a Mammogram Alternative?
    Part 1 and 2
    September 14, 2016

    Dr. Carla Garcia

     

     

    My guest this week is Dr. Carla Garcia, a board certified Doctor of Oriental Medicine with more than 30 years of experience in Integrative Medicine and an expert in thermography.

    In this 2-part interview, she discusses thermography, how it is useful for breast tissue examination and how it differs from mammography.

    http://www.spreaker.com/show/the-radiant-health-shows-tracks

  • American Cancer Society abandons ‘one size fits all’ advice on mammograms

    mammograms

    By Karen Kaplan – Contact Report
    Los Angeles Times – October 20, 2015

    After a thorough review of the benefits and limitations of mammograms, the nation’s top cancer-fighting organization is advising women that they can wait until they are 45 years old to start using the tests to screen for breast cancer.

    New guidelines from the American Cancer Society also assure women that they can have fewer mammograms over the course of their lives.

    The guidelines, published in Wednesday’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., are designed for women who are in good health and have no reason to suspect their risk of developing breast cancer is above average. The findings represent a departure from the group’s previous recommendation that all women with an average risk of breast cancer get annual mammograms starting at age 40.

    The American Cancer Society has updated its guidelines for average risk women.

    Although the American Cancer Society still endorses that course for women who prefer it, the group acknowledged that some women favor a less-aggressive approach to breast cancer screening. If so, it said, they can delay their first mammogram until they are 45 and wait two years between screenings starting at age 55 without fear that doing so will put their health in jeopardy.

    Either way, regular mammograms should continue as long as women have a life expectancy of at least 10 years and are good candidates for breast cancer treatment, the guidelines say. [Read More…]

  • Topol: Time to End Routine Mammography

    Eric J. Topol, MD
    May 06, 2015

    Eric J. Topol, M.D.Mammography Is a Recipe for Net Harm

    The medical community prides itself on evidence to drive important decision-making. But when the evidence is contrary to entrenched medical practice, it has a hard time coming to terms. Such is the case for mammography recommendations. All of the data now available point to significant net harm—far more risk than benefit— for routine mammography. If this were a drug, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would never approve it. Last year, the Swiss Medical Board, after reviewing all of the data, recommended abolishing mammography.[1]

    But last week, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued new draft recommendations regarding who should undergo screening and how often. There was no support for routine screening in women younger than 50 or older than 74 years. But the recommendation for women aged 50-74 years is to undergo mammography every 2 years. There has never been a large study of mammography done every 2 years, so the basis for that periodicity of screening is questionable. But there are abundant data for annual screening and they are not at all supportive of continuing this practice. [Read More…]

  • U.S. breast cancer cases to increase 50 percent by 2030: NCI report

    April 22, 2015

    by Lisa Chamoff , DOTmed contributing reporter

    Signs-of-Breast-CancerThe number of breast cancer cases in the U.S. will be 50 percent higher in 2030 than it was in 2011, with an estimated 441,000 cases in 15 years, according to new research by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

    The research, presented this week at the American Association for Cancer Research annual meeting, shows a marked increase in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors in women older than 70. Part of the increase is due to the fact that women are living longer, and also due to screening technology that enables doctors to diagnose smaller, in situ tumors and invasive tumors, which are mostly detected via mammography.

    The forecast comes the same week that the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force updated, but did not change, its breast cancer screening recommendations, which state that women age 50 to 74 should only be screened once every two years, while women in their 40s should discuss screening with their doctors. [Read More…]

  • USPSTF new breast screening recommendations ‘would result in thousands of breast cancer deaths’: ACR

    April 21, 2015

    by Lauren Dubinsky , Staff Writer

    Breast Cancer Word Cloud ConceptThe U.S Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released the draft update for its breast cancer screening recommendations on Monday — but not much has changed from the 2009 recommendations. The recommendations state that women between ages 50 and 74 should only undergo routine biennial screening and women in their 40s should discuss with their physician whether they need screening.

    On the their website, the Task Force gives screening women ages 40 to 49 a “C” recommendation and wrote, “Women who place a higher value on the potential benefit than the potential harms may choose to begin screening between the ages of 40 and 49 years.” The Task Force gave screening women ages 50 to 74 a “B” recommendation. [Read More…]

  • Breast Biopsies Leave Room for Doubt, Study Finds

    By DENISE GRADY
    MARCH 17, 2015
    Original Link – New York Times

    Breast biopsies are good at telling the difference between healthy tissue and cancer, but less reliable for identifying more subtle abnormalities, a new study finds.

    Because of the uncertainty, women whose results fall into the gray zone between normal and malignant — with diagnoses like “atypia” or “ductal carcinoma in situ” — should seek second opinions on their biopsies, researchers say. Misinterpretation can lead women to have surgery and other treatments they do not need, or to miss out on treatments they do need.
    [Read More…]

  • Mandatory Reporting Of Breast Density In Screening Mammograms. Why The Controversy

    Elaine Schattner
    www.forbes.com

    imagesRecently, the Governor of Michigan signed into law a requirement that radiologists inform women if their mammogram reveals dense breasts. The law will take effect on June 1, 2015. With this act, Michigan became the 21st state to enact legislation on mandatory reporting of breast density found in breast cancer screening.

    The surprisingly controversial law, having to do with a woman’s right to know if her mammogram result is unclear, may go national: Last July, Senators Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) introduced the Breast Density and Mammography Reporting Act. Similar legislation repeatedly has been put before Congress by Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and co-sponsors. [Read More…]

  • Breast cancer: are men the forgotten victims?

    In recognition of Breast Cancer Awareness Month this October, cancer charities and organizations around the globe will be “thinking pink.” On October 24th, Breast Cancer Campaign will have their “Wear it Pink” event, in which people all over the US will wear pink clothing to raise awareness of the disease that will be diagnosed in more than 230,000 women this year. But in this flurry of feminine pink, it can be easy to forget that men can get breast cancer, too.

    indexIn fact, it is estimated that 2,360 new cases of breast cancer will be diagnosed in men in the US this year, and around 430 men will die from the disease.

    Admittedly, breast cancer in men is rare. A man’s lifetime risk of the disease is 1 in 1,000, while a woman’s is 1 in 8. But according to a 2012 study that assessed more than 13,000 male breast cancers from the US National Cancer Data Base, men with breast cancer are less likely to survive the disease than women.

    The researchers found that at diagnosis, men were likely to have much larger breast tumors, and the cancer was more likely to have already spread to other areas of the body.

    “This may be attributed to the fact that awareness of breast cancer is so much greater among women than men,” commented study leader Dr. Jon Greif. “Guidelines call for regular screening, both clinical and mammographic, in women, leading to earlier detection.” [Read More…]

  • Breast density: over 700,000 UK women living with ‘hidden’ breast cancer risk

    1 October 2014

    Risk Determination and Prevention of Breast Cancer[1], published in the journal Breast Cancer Research, identifies the critical gaps that must be addressed if we are to reverse the increase in breast cancer expected over the next 10 years – and reach a tipping point where more breast cancers will be prevented in the general population, not only in women at high risk. High breast density is highlighted as a significant risk factor for breast cancer that could play a key role in redefining the risk of breast cancer faced by each individual woman.

    WH_stages_of_breast_cancer-300x193The number of people diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK is on the rise and this trend is projected to continue until at least 2030. The increase is partly due to an aging population, insufficient levels of physical activity, increases in obesity and alcohol consumption, women having fewer children and having them later in life, all of which are risk factors for the disease.

    The 4 key risk and prevention gaps identified in Risk Determination and Prevention of Breast Cancer are:
    Risk estimation: Accurate ways to estimate risk in the general population and in women at high risk. Adding information about breast density and newly identified genes is likely to improve existing models. [Read More…]